AUG 2015.

CONTENTS

TALKING POINTS

The future of work is demanding a #playzone @lyndagratton http://tinyurl.com/njkfcjz #dantefactor - Jos van Snippenberg - Aug 9
@dantefactor

What do most employees want besides money? http://ow.ly/Qox6f @lyndagratton #future #careers Word Crisper - Aug 7
@WordCrisper

The future belongs to those who prepare for it today.. @lyndagratton for @tedxlondon in 2012 http://tinyurl.com/pxfkkbm #london #tedx #TYCfuture - TEDxYouth@Croydon - Aug 13
@TEDxYouthCroydn

ARTICLES

THE HEAD OF LISTENING: FUTURE-PROOFING INTERNAL COMMUNICATIONS

By Harriet Molyneaux, Head of Digital Engagement, Hot Spots Movement

At a recent Corporate Communications event, I was struck by the declaration of one of the speakers, Katharina Auer of Zurich, that although her email signature reads Head of Employee & Executive Communications, she has the de facto title of ‘Head of Listening’. Behind what might seem like quirkiness lies a valid point: if your people are your greatest asset, it is crucial to have a nuanced understanding of what they are thinking and feeling. After all, communication is a two-way process and we should want to listen to our employees as much as we want them to listen. More


WHY EMPLOYERS ARE SCARED OF OLDER WORKERS

We were really pleased to see an article in the Guardian earlier this month profiling a number of people who are continuing to work - and who enjoy working - into old age. What we noticed was just how different their priorities were from younger colleagues – and this started to give us some insight into just why many organisations are wary of taking on older employees.

For example, in today’s salary-driven workplace, where seniority and experience often command large pay packets, businesses can struggle to understand the mentality of individuals whose primary concern is to find an opportunity to use their experience. More

WHO’S IN OUR NETWORK? – DEBBIE WOSSKOW

Recently, we got to know a really interesting person: Debbie Wosskow, founder and CEO of LoveHomeSwap. Lynda met her at the Asian Leadership Conference in South Korea where they both spoke and has had the pleasure of meeting her a couple more times since. As well as being an entrepreneur in her own right, Debbie is an investor and a leading expert in the Sharing Economy – the process of swapping, sharing and renting embodied by brands such as Airbnb and LoveHomeSwap. She wrote a government paper on the sharing economy which has led the way in promoting understanding of the phenomenon. We love Debbie’s innovative way of thinking about the way we consume – also referred to as collaborative consumption – and have welcomed the opportunity to benefit from her expertise at closer quarters.

Interested in the Sharing Economy? Then follow Debbie on Twitter.

WHY TECH FIRMS ARE TURNING TO LIBERAL ARTS

STEM subjects have been the best route into top tech jobs for years…until now, it seems. We’ve been interested to read about how innovative tech firms such as Slack and Uber are turning to professionals with degrees in liberal arts subjects such as Drama and Philosophy to drive their innovation. So, what is behind this shift?

While STEM graduates are still highly valued for technical roles, it seems that firms are waking up to the value people with expertise in ‘softer’ subjects can bring when it comes to giving their brand the “wow” factor. Known as ‘social alchemists’ these individuals have the skills required to make the crucial connection between the technology their engineer colleagues produce and the customers who will buy it. More

THE NEED FOR CORPORATIONS AS A FORCE
FOR GOOD

The recent news about high-profile British charities Kids Company and the British Association for Adoption and Fostering both closing their doors within a matter of days has sent our thoughts back to the themes covered in Lynda Gratton’s book The Key. While local authorities struggle to fill the gaps left behind by charities that are forced to fold, we’ve been left wondering whether relief shouldn’t come from an entirely different quarter.

As charities and governments suffer a strain on resources, a huge opportunity is arising for corporations – with their stable structures and huge well of resources – to become a force for positive change. We couldn’t help thinking of companies like Zappos, Danone and Yakult, all of which have invested in strengthening the communities around them.

Lynda Gratton’s book The Key: How Corporations Succeed by Solving the World’s Toughest Problems is available to download from Amazon.


HOT SPOTS UPDATES…

We’re currently working on an exciting project with networking expert Professor Raina Brands, one of Lynda’s London Business School Colleagues: a diagnostic based around social networks. While management puts great effort into how an organisation is structured in a formal sense, it frequently pays little or no attention to the informal structures that spring up organically. Networks can jump start initiatives, facilitate change and work around bureaucratic drag but also have the potential to undermine change programs, management directives and diversity policies unless managers learn how to identify and harness them. Our latest collaborative project aims to help organisations understand and identify these informal networks with a view to magnifying their positive effects and minimising the potentially negative ones.

Are you interested in learning how informal networks affect your organisation? Contact tina@hotspotsmovement.com to learn more.

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