MAY 2014.

CONTENTS

HOT SPOTS UPDATES

Lynda Gratton will be speaking about how bringing resilience to a fragile world can start with what happens inside a corporation at RSA on 26th June 2014. Visit the RSA website for details about attending the event or accessing it online.

Did you know you can sign up for FoW membership year round? Join now to participate in our upcoming theme about the 100-year life and its inevitable effect on work and careers. Contact tina@hotspotsmovement.com for more details.

Win a signed copy of Lynda Gratton’s new book, The Key, by entering our Twitter competition. Simply follow @HSpotM on Twitter and retweet the competition updates to enter the draw. You can also guarantee you’ll receive a copy by pre-ordering through Amazon.com.

ARTICLES

LYNDA GRATTON TO JUDGE BRACKEN-BOWER
PRIZE 2014

We’re really pleased to hear that Lynda Gratton is on the panel of judges for the inaugural Bracken-Bower Prize. The prize has been launched to encourage young authors to tackle emerging business themes – and provides new talent with an exciting opportunity to have their voices heard. This year’s £15,000 prize will go to the best proposal for a book about the challenges and opportunities of growth.

Lynda will be judging the prize – which is awarded by the Financial Times and McKinsey & Company – alongside Vindi Banga, Partner, Clayton Dubilier & Rice; Jorma Ollila, Chairman, Royal Dutch Shell and Outokumpu and Dame Gail Rebuck, Chair, Penguin Random House, UK.

If you’re under 35 and have an original proposal for a forward-looking business book you’d like to submit, you can find out more by visiting the Bracken-Bower website.

SPOTLIGHT ON TATA CONSULTANCY SERVICES

In this month’s interview, we talk to Future of Work Research Consortium member Nupur Singh Mallick, Head HR-TCS UK&I, Tata Consultancy Services about how TCS is addressing the issue of resilience by promoting employee wellbeing, providing opportunities to give back to the community and ensuring work is structured to meet the needs of its 310,000 employees, almost a third of whom are under the age of 27.

What would you most like to see happen, in terms of the future of work?
Digital technology is continuing to evolve rapidly, and it infuses nearly every aspect of our working lives. In the future of work, digital will empower people to own their careers, work flexibly, voice their opinions and own their development. In the future what I would most like to see is how fundamentally digital will change HR. More

BUSINESS, SOCIETY AND THE FUTURE OF CAPITALISM

We really enjoyed this recent article, in which McKinsey’s Rik Kirkland interviews Paul Polman, CEO, Unilever. In the course of the interview, Polman discusses his thoughts on “the new corporation”, the need to switch from short-term to long-term thinking and his view that business has a duty to serve society in a sustainable and equitable way. He also shares some great examples of how Unilever is already doing this within its supply chain.

Polman’s initiatives at Unilever are among the examples shared by Lynda Gratton in her forthcoming book The Key: How Corporations Succeed by Solving the World’s Toughest Problems – you can pre-order the book now through Amazon.

WHO’S IN OUR NETWORK? – Ed Lawler

We were happy to hear that Ed Lawler has won the Human Resources Division of the Academy of Management’s Herbert Heneman Jr. Award for Career Achievement, for his excellent record in research along with the impact of his research upon the science, teaching, and practice of human resource management.

Ed is a Fellow of the National Academy of Human Resources and has been a friend and colleague of Lynda’s for over 20 years. He’s one of the longest-standing members of our network and we’re pleased to congratulate him on his success.

HOT SPOTS COMMENTARY - WE HAVE THE TOOLS – BUT WHAT ABOUT THE ATTITUDE?

It seems paradoxical that in a world where we can communicate with anyone in the world at any time, employees are still in the habit of sharing bright ideas only with their manager in the hope that they will be pushed up the food chain. An unfortunate result of this custom is that valuable pockets of expertise can remain untapped due to poor inter-departmental communication or managerial oversight. It’s hard not to notice the way teams and their managers become anxious to gain status by “owning” a project or issue – with the frequent and unfortunate consequence that the company’s leading expert might be left out of the process because they work in another team. More

WHAT WOULD HR POLICIES LOOK LIKE IF THEY WERE BASED ON GIVING?

By Lynda Gratton

Earlier this year, at one of our masterclasses for the Future of Work Research Consortium, I raised the following question: what would HR policies and processes be like if companies based them on the assumption that their employees are programmed to be helpful to others? Here are four key changes I thought we’d see:

  • It would revolutionise the selection process - The first change most companies would make would be to redesign their selection process to identify and favour more cooperative individuals. More

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