MAY 2015.

CONTENTS

TALKING POINTS

There's a revolution at #work: #Freelancing. How does this change life, and our #economic profile? @lyndagratton @LBS http://bit.ly/1PuG2JS - George Mendes - May 19
@George_Mendes

Recruiters will play bigger part in future ‘talent ecosystem’ http://buff.ly/1B7qAre @lyndagratton #TalentWar Recruitment Training - May 20
@RecruitTrainGrp

Kicking off the weekend @ #LBSReunion-very inspired by the 100 year life by profs Andrew Scott and @lyndagratton - Jalas Coaching - May 15
@jalascoaching

ARTICLES


TALENT IN TRANSITION

The process of attracting and acquiring talent is as old as the world of work – so why is talent such an interesting topic right now?

One of the main reasons for this is that the world of work is in transition as we move from an age where, although we all use technology to do our work, jobs are still done by people. What we are moving towards is a working world in which some jobs are augmented – or even carried out entirely – by machines. This necessarily has an effect on the way in which we think about talent. In the past, talent has always been about intelligence, with employers positioning themselves to attract candidates with the best early-life education, the best exam results and the highest IQ scores. More

WILL MACHINES EVER MAKE BETTER DECISIONS THAN HUMANS?

One of our favourite parts of the Masterclass was the audience debate. Led by Lynda, our debaters had to declare themselves for or against the idea that machines will eventually be able to make better decisions than humans. It led to a lively – and eye-opening discussion – which really helped develop our ideas on this most fascinating subject.

MACHINES CAN MAKE BETTER DECISIONS
The group debating for machines’ superior decision-making abilities argued that computers have the edge because they can eliminate the subjectivity which often hampers decisions and reduce the distorting effect of emotions. More

WHO’S IN OUR NETWORK? – DAVID GLEICHER

At our recent Talent Innovation Masterclass in London, we were delighted to welcome David Gleicher – Senior Programme Manager for Science, Technology and Health at the World Economic Forum – as one of our guest speakers. David gave a great talk on the topic of disruptive science which covered two of our favourite topics – Artificial Intelligence and Neuroscience. We were fascinated by his description of the latest advances in AI, particularly when it comes to the development of skills we typically think of as “human”. We were really pleased that David was able to speak to our FoW members and are happy to have someone with insight into such a fast-moving area of science in our network.

You can watch David’s talk on The Hot Spots YouTube channel – have a look and tweet @HSpotM to tell us what you think.

HOT SPOTS UPDATES…

HOT SPOTS DOWN UNDER
The Hot Spots Movement team have just returned from Australia where they ran a series of workshops and Masterclasses for friends new and old. It was a great experience, with lots of interest in our Future of Work Research Consortium and record attendance at our breakfast sessions – a true testament to just how interested Australian employers are in planning the future of their workforce.

NEW FACES – NICOLA SHEARS
We’re delighted to introduce the newest member of the Hot Spots team. Nicola Shears has just joined us as Head of Administration and Community Management, bringing with her a wealth of experience from previous customer focused roles within large blue chip companies.

Nicola studied Spanish and Russian at the University of Bristol and has also studied at Herzen University in St Petersburg. Her international mindset has been furthered by working in both Spain and Argentina. She brings a high degree of cultural awareness and strong organisational and communication skills to the team.

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