SEPT 2013.

CONTENTS

HOT SPOTS UPDATES

Masterclass, on New Ways of Working, on 28 October in London. For members of the Future of Work Research Consortium.

We have a few seats left at our breakfast session on FoWlab jams on 17 October. Please get in touch with Keith Dalton if you’re interested in receiving an invitation.

ARTICLES

IS BEING COMPETITIVE, ORGANISED AND A LITTLE NEUROTIC THE KEY TO CORPORATE SUCCESS?

by Tina Schneidermann, COO, Hot Spots Movement

What does it take to ensure your child has a successful career? According to Hilary Levey Friedman’s blog post in the HBR Blog Network from 3 September, it appears many parents in the US believe that being competitive, organised and little neurotic are key to success. This belief is particularly strong when it comes to their daughters – leading many to enrol girls in competitive sports from a young age in order to prepare them for a competitive future in the workplace.

Hilary studied 95 families with elementary school age children as part of research that led to her book Playing to Win: Raising Children in a Competitive Culture. She identified five skills and capabilities that parents hope their children gain from participating in competitive sports: (1) internalizing the importance of winning, (2) bouncing back from a loss to win in the future, (3) learning how to perform within time limits, (4) learning how to succeed in stressful situations, and (5) being able to perform under the gaze of others. More

HOT OFF THE PRESS: INSIGHTS FROM THE I&D RESEARCH CONSORTIUM MID-WAY WORKSHOP

We’re fresh from the I&D Research Consortium mid-way workshop, which brought together professionals from organisations as diverse as Unilever, TCS, Novartis and Standard Chartered Bank to discuss a range of topics around Inclusion and Diversity.

Much of the day’s agenda revolved around changing the way we think about diversity issues. Lynda’s keynote “The Key to Reimagining Careers,” set the tone by identifying key ways in which diversity agendas are changing – particularly when it comes to generational diversity. She focused on two key changes in this area: the first is the fact that with many Baby Boomers planning to work beyond the age of 65 and Gen Z-ers fast approaching the age where they will start to enter the workplace, many organisations have to address the issue of generational diversity for the first time. More

COMMUNITY OF PRACTICE TO SUPPORT COLLABORATION

The Hot Spots Movement has being running bespoke jams – or FoWlabs – for our clients for some time now. Jams are typically three-day, guided online conversations focused on exploring a set of key themes. They create an opportunity for up to 5,000 members of an organisation to connect to each other across divisions, functions, countries and seniority.

One of the insights that frequently emerges from the jam process is the need to develop effective virtual teams and for virtual teams to get support to fulfil their mission. Team members specifically need support in how to coordinate work, build trust and stay connected. This necessitates a culture of collaboration, which in turn involves changing many deeply engrained people and organisational practices. Our jams also reveal that more than half of those joining the jam believe the current culture does not encourage such collaboration. To that effect, we’ve developed a collaboration support platform with the building of a community of practice as the focal point. This graphic illustration shows some of the core activities and a typical sequence.

The duration can be anything from a couple of months to a year, and it’s a highly customisable platform as no two organisations are the same.


WHO IS IN OUR NETWORK?

Lynda is recently back from speaking at the Nordic Business Forum - a high-profile event that attracts an impressive range of delegates and speakers. One of the most interesting speakers at this year’s event was Malcolm Gladwell, who was there to about the power of individuals or companies that can bring inventions together and how their ability to do this can put them in a stronger position than those who come up with innovations first.

Best known for his worldwide best-seller The Tipping Point, Malcolm is a journalist and the author of five books, in including Blink and Outliers and in 2005, was named one of Time‘s 100 Most Influential People. Always intellectually provocative, Malcolm is known for taking a controversial stance when it comes to issues such as performance - as he did at the Nordic Business Forum with his assertion that being first to the table with innovation doesn't always pay. As well as being a captivating speaker, Malcolm's strength lies in locating engaging stories, business ideas and scientific research that overlap – allowing him to illustrate his ideas and bring them to life through storytelling. This storytelling element is another reason our team loves reading his books – we’re looking forward to reading his latest work, David and Goliath as soon as we can get our hands on a copy.

You can see the full list of his books here.

You are receiving this email because you are subscribed to the Hot Spots Movement newsletter. If you would like to unsubscribe please click here.

www.hotspotsmovement.com
tina@hotspotsmovement.com

LONDON

Somerset House
West Wing
Strand
WC2R 1LA
tel: +44 (0) 207 759 1848